Embracing Adventure “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” ~~Hellen Keller

Strolling through Speyer Part 2

Last time, we saw some of Speyer, including the outside of the Dom (Cathedral). Today, we’ll go inside the cathedral and take a tour through some more of the city.

Looking up to the left near the entrance to the Dom you’ll see Frescoes painted by Johann Schraudolph.

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On the wall of the left side there are several Bible scenes.

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There were also several confessionals on the left side. Four have wood carvings. This is the last one of the Crucifixion, including the angels gathering Jesus’s blood for the Holy Eucharist. The ones preceding it depict The Good Shepherd, the Parable of the Prodigal Son, and the Fall of Man and Expulsion from the Garden.

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There were stairs to the left side we walked up. This is the view looking over them followed by a window on the wall to the left of that view.

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On the right side, going up the stairs takes you to the area where the crucifix is. This bell is on that side.

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This is a closer view of the crucifix.

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Looking back out toward the entrance of the church. The organ is to the right. Above it is a crown which I’ve read is a replica of one in the treasury of the Speyer Kaiserdom. The crown hangs over the crypt of the Holy Roman emperors and German kings of the Salian, Hohenstaufen, and Hapsburg dynasties. On the wall to the right, you can see more of the Johann Schraudolph frescoes.

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From the room we were in, there was an entrance to the left to the top part of the Doppelkapelle (Double chapel). The fence goes around an opening in an octagon shape (I took the photo below from behind the other side), and one of the lamps is at each corner. You can sort of see down into the lower chapel from there (I didn’t take a picture because I was going down to take better ones). The top level is dedicated to St. Catherine of Alexandria and is used as a reliquary.

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This relic is the head of HL Papst Stephanus I (Pope St. Stephan I) on the other side of the same room.

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This is another relic, a bone. The inscription says it is from HL. Guido von Pomposa (St. Guido of Pomposa).

Another relic in the same room. The outside reads “”Blessed Paul Josef Nardini – Pastor, Apostle social, religious founder” with the birth and death year. I’ve read that the parchment wrapped around the bone says “Blessed Paul Joseph, pray for us in God’s throne!”
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This is to the left of the first picture. I am far too lazy to translate the plaque but the top of it indicates it’s for Edith Stein (Saint Teresia Benedicta of the Cross).

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This is on the wall next to the previous picture. I am not sure what the inside is/represents but the words in the circle say “St. Edith Stein Of the Cross Blessed”.

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This is in the lower level of the double chapel, dedicated to Saint Emmeram (Saint Martin). It’s used as a baptism chapel. This is a bust of St. Edith. I’m not sure what the plaque beneath it says.

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This is a close-up of the Taufbecken (baptism basin).

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These prayer candles are on the right side of the Cathedral.

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This is across from the prayer candles.

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After the cathedral, we decided to wander the city. We walked down Maximilian Strasse, the street which the cathedral is at the end of. There happened to be a market going on that day, and in the distance we saw the Altpörtel (Old Gate). At 55 meters, it’s one of the tallest gates in Germany. There’s supposed to be a great view from the top, but we didn’t go up.

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This picture was taken as we approached the gate to walk under it.

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We walked around town a bit and found St. Joseph’s church. This is within viewing distance of the Protestant church you’ll see next and was supposedly built in response to that one.

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A little further down at Bartholomäus-Weltz-Platz we came across Die Gedächtniskirche der Protestation (The Memorial Church of the Protestation). Speyer’s tourism site just calls it “Memorial Church”. It was built to commemorate the protest at Parliament carried out by the Protestant estates of the Empire.

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This is the entrance to Memorial Church, but we did not go inside.

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This is another view of the Old Gate, coming from the other side. It was raining at this point in our trip.

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This is the top of St. George fountain with St. George the Dragon Slayer.

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This is a gazebo depicting Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane.

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We got tired of getting rained on and decided to go into the Historisches Museum Der Pfalz Speyer (Historic Museum of the Palatinate Speyer). They were having a special exhibit on “Discovering Egypt’s Treasures” which was included in the ticket. Some of the plaques were provided in English and we got audio sets to play at various points with information in English. After that, we went through some of the permanent exhibits: Weinmuseum (Wine Museum), Urgeschichte (Prehistory) and Römerzeit (Roman Era). I didn’t see signs not to take pictures, but there were many employees walking around looking serious, so I didn’t. If you want to get an idea of the Egypt exhibit they do have some pictures on their site and you can see example of some of the permanent exhibits here.
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I hope you’ve enjoyed our stroll through Speyer!

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4 Thoughts on “Strolling through Speyer Part 2

  1. Hi! I was searching for Heidelberg things and I came across your blog. I was an army brat living in H-Town for 3 years. Your blog is awesome to read because it’s fascinating hearing the army wife side. Your posts about PHV and places in and around Heidelberg are my favorites. Many fond memories flooded back. I will visit your blog often. Thanks for blogging!

  2. Hah, now these things I do recognize. Especially the Old Gate. And Maximilianstrasse, many fond memories lie awake in me – of sitting in cafes and shopping through the city.

    My former friend used to work in the Historisches Museum when she was a teenager, can you believe it? So interesting to see how someone from so far away describes her first impressions of the city… I first got to see Speyer when I was 15, I believe. I def was not into all the churches and historic stuff like you guys are at this point. But we did see that one museum a bit outside of the city, I think it had to do with aeronautics or something resembling that.

    • Cool. We did not end up eating while we were there that I recall which means we probably didn’t since I usually take pictures of almost everything lol.

      That’s neat. I wouldn’t mind working in a museum. I don’t think I was really into history at that age either. Now I find it all pretty interesting. I am not really religious so seeing the churches is more for the beauty of the architecture and whatever is inside than any kind of spiritual reason to be there. I think I know which museum you’re talking about. The only reason we picked the history museum instead of that one was that we were parked near that one and the history museum saved us a walk to our car in the pouring rain lol.

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